The Birds And The Bees…5 LIFESAVING Tips To Take The Sting Out

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By Katy Cable-TWR
A 2 min. Read 


To Bee Or Not To Bee! For years I've been hearing how our planet and our very survival is at great risk due to billions and billions of bees dying off at an alarming rate. As scary a thought as that is, I can’t understand it since I personally have seen no shortage of bees. As a matter of fact, quite the contrary. They seem to be buzzing around everywhere I look.

I'm deathly allergic to bees and just the sight of one puts me in a sheer panic! I'm often that crazy lady running around ballistically screaming and making a huge scene at the first sign of anything buzzing around me. And usually it’s just someone’s cellphone. Between my frantic behavior and my Chanel No. 5 cologne, I’m a total
“bee magnet” and they come after me like starving linebackers hitting the all-you-can-eat buffet! I've been stung on many occasions and because I'm allergic, my reaction gets worse with each subsequent attack! It’s so bad that I've been warned a sting on my face or neck could be deadly and I now carry an Epipen®️ to be safe. But what about our dogs?

Brachy (flat-nosed) dogs have a difficult time breathing as it is and a sting or any type of swelling to the face can be life-threatening. Now that the temperatures have warmed up, the flowers are in full bloom and we're spending more time outside, here are some important safety tips to both prevent and treat a bee-sting.

As the saying goes, "An ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure!" The first defense against bee stings is to try and avoid them in the first place. Don't leave your dog outside alone if your yard has plants that attract bees. Better yet, replace plants with varieties that don’t attract them. Roses are great options and mint is also a favorite.

Walk earlier in the AM or later in the PM when temps are cooler and bees aren't out in droves. If possible avoid going near certain flowers, herbs, shrubs and grasses that attract bees. Also stay clear of brushy bushes and trails.

Double check where your dog is going potty and lead them to safe places. Ditto for curious sniffing. Pet stores now carry lightweight clothing, caps, sunglasses and booties that might be a good option for outdoor hiking or even walks in bee prone areas. If you’re out hiking or in a place where you’re not able to race to a vet, I recommend carrying a bee emergency kit with you. I also advise keeping your dog covered up in lightweight clothing and booties.

🐝🐝TAKING THE STING OUT OF BEE STINGS🐝🐝

1. If an isolated bee pops out of nowhere and stings your dog, check and see if the stinger and venom sac are still attached. If so:
SLIDE A CREDIT CARD ALONG THE SITE TO GENTLY REMOVE THE STINGER WITHOUT pushing more venom into your dog's bloodstream.

2. IF YOUR DOG IS STUNG ON THE FACE AND/OR YOU SEE THE SIGHT IS SWELLING UP, ADMINISTER BENEDRYL & PREDNISONE IMMEDIATELY!

3. FOR PAIN RELIEF: MAKE A PASTE IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND BY MIXING BAKING SODA WITH A SPLASH OF WATER. DAB IT ON SITE. You can re-apply this paste every 2-3 hours as necessary. CBD can also be applied topically and orally!

4. APPLY ICE AND GET TO A VET IMMEDIATELY TO AVOID FURTHER COMPLICATIONS.

BEE STING KIT:
🐝Prednisone Pill (5mg pill for 10-25lb dogs)
🐝Benedryl Pill (1/2 25mg pill for 15-25lb dogs)
🐝small pill pockets for administering pills
🐝Baking Soda (put a few tbs in a plastic bag
🐝small doggie bandana
🐝small ice pack
🐝small bottle of water
🐝credit card or hotel key-for removing stinger
🐝1 small baby aspirin (for pain)
🐝CBD Oil

Nothing can spoil a good time in the great outdoors like a nasty bee sting, so these tips will allow you to "BEE" 🐝 SAFE! Pugs & Kisses! -Katy